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OSU Center for Health Sciences News

Thursday, Feb. 13, 2014

OSU-CHS joins rural health advocacy efforts during NRHA's Policy Institute

Amanda Jantz, Matt Haney, Congressman Markwayne Mullin, Mickey Borgsmiller and Alisha Murrow meet during the National Rural Health Association Policy Institute.
Amanda Jantz, Matt Haney, Congressman Markwayne Mullin, Mickey Borgsmiller and Alisha Murrow meet during the National Rural Health Association Policy Institute.

Members of the Student Osteopathic Rural Medicine (StORM) Club and OSU-CHS administrators and staff met with federal officials during the 25th Annual National Rural Health Association Policy Institute last week in Washington, D.C.

Second-year medical students Amanda Jantz, Matt Haney, Mickey Borgsmiller and Alisha Murrow joined ongoing NRHA advocacy efforts to advocate for rural health policy and legislation. They met with senators, representatives and their staffers to seek their support to protect and strengthen rural Medicare programs, modify the Medicare sequestration process to avoid disproportionate harm to the rural health safety net and increase  funding for rural health programs.

William Pettit, D.O., interim senior associate dean for academic affairs and associate dean for rural health, Duane Koehler, D.O., assistant to the dean for rural education, Vicky Pace, director of rural medical education, Nicole Neilson, Southwest regional coordinator, and Cori Kaiser, director of the Oklahoma Office of Rural Health, also participated in advocacy efforts during the institute.

OSU Center for Rural Health distributes SHIP grants to 59 rural hospitals

The OSU Center for Rural Health recently distributed more than $400,000 in grants to 59 rural Oklahoma hospitals through the Small Hospital Improvement Program.

The SHIP grants, funded by Health Resources and Services Administration of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, assist small hospitals with participating in certain reforms outlined in the Affordable Care Act.

Each hospital was awarded $7,415.50 for utilizing value-based purchasing, implementing a Medicare reimbursement system and developing data collection activities.

To qualify for the program, hospitals must have 49 or fewer staffed beds and be located outside of a metropolitan statistical area or within a rural census tract.

OSU in Tulsa Health Fair offers health information, services

Students wait for a free glaucoma exam during the Spring 2013 OSU in Tulsa Health Fair.
Students wait for a free glaucoma exam during the Spring 2013 OSU in Tulsa Health Fair.

OSU-CHS students, faculty and staff will have the opportunity to get helpful health and nutrition information at the Spring 2014 OSU in Tulsa Health Fair on Tuesday, Feb. 25 from 1:30-4:30 p.m. in the OSU-Tulsa Main Hall Commons.

The OSU Medical Clinic will provide cholesterol and body fat screenings and the OSU-Tulsa Wellness Center will host fitness challenges.

In addition, healthy snacks and beverages will be provided. Participants can register to win door prizes. For more information about the OSU in Tulsa Health Fair, contact Jeremiah Watkins.

Training available to use Tandy Community Supercomputer

Tandy Community Supercomputer
Tandy Community Supercomputer

The OSU in Tulsa Office of Research will host training sessions for faculty, students  and staff on use of the Tandy Community Supercomputer on Feb. 27 from noon to 1:30 p.m. in D-107 and March 13 from 9 a.m. to noon at OSU-Tulsa in Main Hall 2323. The Tandy Supercomputing Center, an initiative of the Oklahoma Innovation Institute and Tulsa Research Partners, offers researchers access to high performance computational capabilities in Tulsa.

The first session will offer a broad overview of supercomputing, the Tandy Supercomputing Center and its services. Attendees will learn basic concepts of applying high performance computing to their work and find out about computing resources across the state available to OSU in Tulsa researchers. The second session is a hands-on workshop to learn the basics of using the supercomputer system, like logging in, compiling code and submitting jobs. The class will also provide an introduction to parallelism and the storage hierarchy. Attendance in the first session is recommended but not required and seating is limited. 

Significant experience in computing is not required for the sessions. However, some basic programming knowledge is assumed during training. Contact Terry Brown for more information or to register for the March 13 session.

Getting an Early Start in Medicine

Getting an Early Start in Medicine

With our state facing a shortage of primary care physicians, Oklahoma State University Center for Health Sciences has partnered with colleges and universities across the state to identify talented students for the OSU College of Osteopathic Medicine Early Admissions Program. OSU-CHS' first Early Admissions Scholars, Jessica Branstetter, Chá Hutchison and David McVay, will finish their bachelor's degrees while completing the first year of medical school. These students will become physicians in rural and underserved areas and help ensure a healthier future for all Oklahomans.

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