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OSU Center for Health Sciences News

Thursday, March 6, 2014

Students gain practical experience during mock crime scene exercise

Forensic science students Matthew Green, Chelsea Bullard, Kyla Jorgenson and Garrett Rosser participate in a mock crime scene on Saturday at Eugene Field.
Forensic sciences students Matthew Green, Chelsea Bullard, Kyla Jorgenson and Garrett Rosser prepare for the mock crime scene exercise on Saturday.

Six OSU-CHS graduate students gained first-hand experience in crime scene investigation during a mock burglary and school shooting at Eugene Field Elementary on Saturday. The exercise was part of the Advanced Criminalistics course taught by  Ron Thrasher, Ph.D., assistant professor of forensic sciences.

As part of the course, students work with forensic experts on a variety of forensic analyses, including blood splatter, death scene investigation and firearms. In Saturday's exercise, Matthew Green, Chelsea Bullard, Kyla Jorgenson, Garrett Rosser, Julie Argo and Sarah Habib investigated a mock burglary and school shooting under the supervision of a Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives special agent. The students processed the crime scene, collecting evidence they will analyze in DNA, toxicology and behavioral laboratories at OSU-CHS.

The data collected by the forensic researchers will be used by University of Tulsa law students in a mock trial later this semester. Thrasher and the students will also present a training seminar for Eugene Field Elementary faculty based on the exercise. Eugene Field Elementary is OSU-CHS' Partner In Education school.

VANGUARD: It takes a village

Sasha Watts, Amy Ellman, exercise specialist assistant, Emily McGinley and Whitney Moore walk through Centennial Green in downtown Tulsa for Cowboys Get Healthy, Get Fit.
Sasha Watts, Amy Ellman, exercise specialist assistant, Emily McGinley and Whitney Moore walk through Centennial Green in downtown Tulsa for Cowboys Get Healthy, Get Fit.

While it may take a village to raise a child, Colony Fugate, D.O., and Teri Bourdeau Ph.D., know it takes an even greater commitment to raise a healthy child. Fugate, a pediatrician at OSU-CHS and medical director of the OSU Family Health and Nutrition Clinic, believes it takes an entire community to address the many underlying issues that impact Oklahoma’s obesity level.

Fugate and Bourdeau, a clinical psychologist at OSU-CHS, are using an evidence-based approach to combat childhood obesity through the Tulsa-based clinic. Working with Sara Malone, a licensed dietitian, and Kerry Morgan, the clinic’s certified health education specialist and a clinical instructor in the School of Applied Health and Educational Psychology at OSU-Tulsa, the OSU team has developed a program to support children who are overweight or obese and their families.

They have also built community partnerships with other local and state organizations to extend the clinic’s reach and developed new curricula to provide OSU students with the skills to address weight issues in Oklahoma’s communities.

Read more about the efforts of the OSU Family Health and Nutrition Clinic from the 2014 issue of Vanguard on the OSU-CHS website.

OSU-CHS students to compete in preliminary Three Minute Thesis contest

OSU Three Minute Thesis

Thirteen forensic and biomedical sciences students will vie to represent OSU-CHS at the 2014 OSU Three Minute Thesis Competitionduring a preliminary contest on Friday, March 28 at noon in D-107.

The competition challenges master's and doctoral students to present a compelling pitch of their thesis or dissertation topic and its significance in just three minutes using only one PowerPoint slide. 3MT supports the development of students' ability to explain their research effectively in laymen's terms.

Judges will select a first, second and third place winner based on communication style, comprehension and engagement. Audience members will vote for the "People's Choice" award. The first place winner will receive $100 and compete against other OSU students on April 10 at the Little Union Theatre in the OSU-Stillwater Student Union.

Guest judges for the contest include Kuma Browne, Tulsa Regional Chamber education division program manager, Ann Domin, INCOG deputy director, Wayne Greene, Tulsa World editorial pages editor, Rae Krolikowski, Redberry Farm: Cedar Rock Inn and Silo Center director of marketing and event specialist and George Louthan, director of the Tandy Supercomputing Center at the Oklahoma Innovation Institute.

Ugly bugs help Oklahoma schools win stereomicroscopes

The blister beetle of Emerson Elementary in Coalgate was one of the winners of the ugly bug contest.
The blister beetle of Emerson Elementary in Coalgate was one of the winners of the ugly bug contest.

A praying mantis, robber fly and velvet ant were among the hideous insects that helped 13 Oklahoma elementary schools win new stereomicroscopes as part of the 17th annual Ugly Bug Contest. 

More than 80 schools throughout the state competed in the Oklahoma Microscopy Society contest,  which is supported by OSU-CHS, OSU-Stillwater, the University of Oklahoma and the University of Tulsa and funded through a grant from Phillips 66. The winning schools include East Elementary in Anadarko, Canute Elementary, Emerson Elementary in Coalgate, Inola Elementary, Holy Trinity in Edmond, Schwartz Elementary in Oklahoma City, East Elementary in Weatherford, Will Rogers Elementary in Oklahoma City, Perkins-Tryon Elementary in Perkins, Roff School, Yale Elementary, Marlow Middle School and Grandview School in Comanche.

Each year, students collect bugs and pick the class favorite to submit for the contest. A report and the insect are sent to participating universities to be processed and photographed for the contest.

In addition to receiving the stereomicroscopes, the ugliest bug photographs are featured on an annual poster distributed to the winners.

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