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OSU Center for Health Sciences News

Thursday, Sept. 18, 2014

OSU-CHS offers arson, explosives investigation graduate degree option

arson, explosives investigation
IMPEX instructors demonstrate a chemical reaction during a training exercise.

OSU-CHS is now offering an Arson and Explosives Investigation option as part of the Master of Science in Forensic Sciences degree program offered through the Center for Improvised Explosives (IMPEX), part of the School of Forensic Sciences. IMPEX helps to alleviate the threats of improvised explosives by combining research, testing, training and education for law enforcement investigators.

 “The world has seen an increase in terrorist attacks using improvised or homemade explosives and our goal is to offer advanced instruction for law enforcement investigators who respond to these increasingly dangerous situations,” said OSU-CHS President Kayse Shrum, D.O. “This new option expands the training and research opportunities we offer through IMPEX and will potentially save many lives.”

The Arson and Explosives Investigation option was created to offer advanced training for law enforcement and military officials working actively in the field of explosives and fire investigation. Classroom and online courses focus on the chemistry of improvised explosives, pyrotechnics, fire dynamics, blast effects, evidence collection techniques, laboratory techniques and procedures, device and ordnance identification and other field related topics.

The program, which has already attracted interest from across the country, includes a research component requiring students to complete a forensic sciences analysis worthy of being published in a peer-reviewed journal.

STATE MAGAZINE: Native Explorers

Native Explorers participants include back row, from left, Chickasaw Educator Darius Roebuck, Jake Duke, Dr. Darrin Pagnac, Dr. Nicholas Czaplewski, Jared Wahkinney, Native Explorers Foundation Executive Director Jeff Hargrave and mentor Brent Battles; second row, Chicksaw Educator Germain Fields, Alex Hardison, mentor Kayln Barnoski, mentor Brandie Macdonald, mentor Sara Hofferber, Christopher Nixon, Julia Conneywerdy, David Alexander, T’ata Roberts and Courtney Hull; and front row, Dr. Kent Smith.
Native Explorers participants include back row, from left, Chickasaw Educator Darius Roebuck, Jake Duke, Dr. Darrin Pagnac, Dr. Nicholas Czaplewski, Jared Wahkinney, Native Explorers Foundation Executive Director Jeff Hargrave and mentor Brent Battles; second row, Chicksaw Educator Germain Fields, Alex Hardison, mentor Kayln Barnoski, mentor Brandie Macdonald, mentor Sara Hofferber, Christopher Nixon, Julia Conneywerdy, David Alexander, T’ata Roberts and Courtney Hull; and front row, Dr. Kent Smith.

Under the blazing New Mexico sun, Jake Duke spent the first part of summer doing something he had never done before – digging for vertebrate fossils. Duke was one of 10 American Indian college students who participated in a unique summer expedition offered by the OSU Center for Health Sciences in Tulsa. The program, Native Explorers, combines science and medicine with American Indian cultures to spark an interest in these career fields.

Kent Smith, Ph.D., interim associate dean in the Office for the Advancement of American Indians in Medicine and Science and associate professor of anatomy and cell biology at OSU-CHS, is hoping to attract American Indians to medicine and other STEM professions through Native Explorers.

Smith co-founded Native Explorers Foundation with Reggie Whitten, one of two senior partners at Whitten Burrage Law Firm in Oklahoma City. Jeffrey Hargrave currently serves as the executive director of the Native Explorers Foundation, which provides funding for the programs initiatives.

The Native Explorers program is part of an expanded effort by OSU Center for Health Sciences to attract American Indian students to careers as physicians and scientists. The new Office for the Advancement of American Indians in Medicine and Science serves as an outreach effort to Native American tribes in Oklahoma.

Read the full story from the Fall 2014 issue of STATE Magazine.

OSU-CHS anatomy associate professor featured in National Geographic

Weil
Weil

Anne Weil, Ph.D., associate professor of anatomy, was recently featured in an article published in National Geographic discussing findings that lead researchers to draw new conclusions about mammalian evolution during the Mesozoic era.

The information is based on a new fossil of a squirrel-sized mammal found in China. The fossils suggest that mammals evolved earlier and faster than previously thought.

Read the full article online at the National Geographic website.

IN THE NEWS