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OSU Center for Health Sciences News

Tuesday, Nov. 25, 2014

Braman American Legion supports OSU-CHS traumatic brain injury research

Johnny Stephens, OSU-CHS interim vice president for research and chief operating officer, left, accepts the donation from Rusty Partee, Tim Smith, American Legion Department of Oklahoma commander, Randy McRae, Marv Sandbek, American Legion Department of Oklahoma historian, Gary Brech and Scott Tafoya, American Legion Department of Oklahoma service officer.
Johnny Stephens, Pharm.D., OSU-CHS interim vice president for research and chief operating officer, left, accepts the donation from Rusty Partee, Tim Smith, American Legion Department of Oklahoma commander, Randy McRae, Marv Sandbek, American Legion Department of Oklahoma historian, Gary Brech and Scott Tafoya, American Legion Department of Oklahoma service officer.

The American Legion Hennessey Cunningham Post 259 from Braman donated funds from their annual poppy sales on Monday to support the OSU-CAHM’s research on hyperbaric oxygen therapy treatment for veterans with traumatic brain injuries.

The donation came from the proceeds of the post’s annual poppy sales campaign, a nationwide American Legion program. During World War I, the poppy flower, which adorned the battlefields of Flanders Field, became a symbol of those who had fought and died during the war. The American Legion Auxiliary Poppy Program began in 1921 to support and raise awareness for veterans.

American Legion Post 259 was represented by Marv Sandbek, American Legion Department of Oklahoma historian, Rusty Partee, Gary Brech, Randy McRae and Randy Teeters, post commander. American Legion Department of Oklahoma Commander Tim Smith and Department Service Officer Scott Tafoya also participated in the presentation.

Gignac’s Alaskan dinosaur excursion featured in museum exhibit

Gignac
Gignac

If braving the wilds of the North Slope of Alaska is necessary to learn more about the dinosaurs that lived in the Arctic Circle millions of years ago, Paul Gignac, Ph.D., assistant professor of anatomy and cell biology, will do it.

Gignac joined a team of seven that made the trek last August to a remote site off the Colville River near the location where it was first discovered that dinosaurs had lived in the Arctic.

During the two weeks of digging and sifting, the team found an abundance of fossil material, which is now being analyzed and prepared at the University of Alaska Museum of the North in Fairbanks. In addition to Gignac, other researchers on the team were from Florida State University and the University of Alaska Museum of the North.

The excursion will be featured at the museum next summer in a special exhibit called “Expedition Alaska: Dinosaurs” and will feature video of the team, including Gignac, on location.

Support a Eugene Field Elementary student from OSU-CHS Angel Tree

Angel Tree

Students, faculty and staff have an opportunity to make the holidays a little brighter for students at Eugene Field Elementary, OSU-CHS’ Partner in Education school, by supporting the Angel Tree.

Choose a card from the Angel Tree located next to Matthews Bookstore and print your name on the sign-up sheet. Each angel should receive a toy, a book and an item of clothing like a jacket or shirt. The gift amount limit is $40 for each child.

Place the items in a gift bag, unwrapped, with the student’s card attached and drop them off in the sleigh at the Information Desk by Dec. 10. For more information, contact the Outreach and Special Events team.

OSU-CHS, Physicians Clinics to close for Thanksgiving holiday

OSU-CHS and OSU Physicians Clinics will be closed Thursday and Friday for the Thanksgiving break.

There will be no classes and all business and academic services offices, including Matthews Bookstore, will be closed throughout the weekend. Regular hours will resume Monday.

The OSU-CHS library will close at 7 p.m. tomorrow and resume regular hours at 9 a.m. on Saturday.

First Friday Seminar to examine the effect of exergaming on dementia

Hanley
Hanley

Cay Anderson-Hanley, Ph.D., associate professor of psychology and neuroscience at Union College in Schenectady, New York, will discuss the effect of physical and mental exercise on dementia at noon on Friday, Dec. 5.

The seminar, “Move and use it or lose it? Does physical or mental exercise impact dementia?” will focus on results from research conducted through the Healthy Aging and Neuropsychology Lab. The research findings suggest that interactive physical and cognitive exercise, or exergaming, might be more beneficial than physical exercise alone in slowing the progression of dementia.

Anderson-Hanley earned a doctorate in counseling psychology and completed a postdoctoral fellowship in geriatric psychology and neuropsychology at the University of California, Los Angeles. She is a licensed clinical psychologist and has conducted a number of studies on the impact of exergaming on neurological disorders.

The seminar will be in D-107 and is free and open to the public. It is presented by the OSU-CHS Department of Pharmacology and Physiology.

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