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OSU Center for Health Sciences News

Thursday, Feb. 12, 2015

OSU-CHS representatives discuss rural health initiatives at NRHA Policy Institute

From left, Ashton Clayborn, D.O., OSU-CHS President Kayse Shrum, D.O., Rep. Tom Cole, Charles Bingham, OMS-II, Duane Koehler, D.O., Cailin Schaede, OMS-II and Halie Muckelrath, OMS-II, at the congressman’s office in Washington, D.C.
From left, Ashton Clayborn, D.O., OSU-CHS President Kayse Shrum, D.O., Rep. Tom Cole, Charles Bingham, OMS-II, Duane Koehler, D.O., Cailin Schaede, OMS-II and Halie Muckelrath, OMS-II, at the congressman’s office in Washington, D.C. (Photo courtesy of Rep. Tom Cole's office)

OSU-CHS President Kayse Shrum, D.O., and several students, staff and alumni met with Congressional representatives to discuss rural health concerns in Oklahoma during the 26th annual National Rural Health Association Policy Institute last week in Washington, D.C.

Shrum, second-year medical students Charles Bingham, Halie Muckelrath and Cailin Schaede, Duane Koehler, D.O., assistant to the dean for rural education, Danelle Shufeldt, regional coordinator for the OSU Center for Rural Health, and Ashton Clayborn, D.O., family medicine resident in Talihina, represented OSU-CHS at the conference. They were joined by Andy Fosmire, vice president for rural health at the Oklahoma Hospital Association, and Darin Farrell, hospital administrator at Arbuckle Memorial Hospital.

Group members met with Sen. James Lankford, Rep. Jim Bridenstine, Rep. Tom Cole, Rep. Frank Lucas, Rep. Markwayne Mullin and Rep. Steve Russell, along with a representative from Sen. Jim Inhofe’s office. During the meetings, the students shared their stories and plans to practice in rural Oklahoma. The group also discussed the importance of continued funding for graduate medical education, preservation of critical access hospitals and the impact a physician has on a rural community’s health and economic well-being.

Fugate receives board certification in obesity medicine

Fugate
Fugate

Colony Fugate, D.O., clinical associate professor of pediatrics, has been certified as a Diplomate of the American Board of Obesity Medicine, a specialist in obesity medicine. ABOM Diplomates complete rigorous training and extensive examination to receive the certification.

Fugate is medical director of the OSU Family Health and Nutrition Clinic, which offers individualized and comprehensive support for overweight and obese children and their families. The clinic provides a comprehensive, evidence-based approach to the prevention, assessment and treatment of childhood obesity through multidisciplinary intervention, education, research, advocacy and collaborative outreach.

As of Feb. 1, there are only 14 physicians in Oklahoma who have received the obesity medicine certification from the American Board of Obesity Medicine and Fugate is one of only two in Tulsa and northeastern Oklahoma. ABOM was established in 2011 to develop criteria and oversee certification of physicians in obesity medicine.

OSU-CHS associate dean to be featured speaker at Research Day

Smith
Smith

Kent Smith, Ph.D., associate professor of anatomy at OSU-CHS, will be the featured speaker at OSU in Tulsa Research Day on Feb. 20. The presentation will begin at noon in Founders Hall.

He will discuss Native Explorers, a program he founded to recruit more American Indian college students into STEM and medicine. Since 2010, nearly 50 undergraduate and graduate Native American students have been mentored on scientific expeditions through the program.

Smith also is associate dean of OSU-CHS’ Office for the Advancement of American Indians in Medicine and Science.

Research Day registration will open at 11 a.m. and lunch will be served at noon. Students and faculty must sign up for oral and poster submissions by Friday, Feb. 13. For more information, contact Amanda Benn at 918-561-1402 or visit the Research Day website.

Simulation gives students glimpse into sensory, physical deficits of aging

Lynda Crouch, OTR/L, ATP, a low-vision occupational therapist with NewView Oklahoma, helps an OSU-COM student experience what older patients with impaired sight might encounter on a daily basis.
Lynda Crouch, OTR/L, ATP, a low-vision occupational therapist with NewView Oklahoma, helps an OSU-COM student experience what older patients with impaired sight might encounter on a daily basis.

First-year Oklahoma State University medical student Breana Smith may have looked silly with cotton balls in her nose and blacked-out goggles over her eyes. But the experience was helping improve her skills as a physician.

Deprived of two senses – sight and smell - she was challenged to identify broccoli, potato chips and other foods using touch, taste and sound.  

“If you don’t have a sense of smell and you can’t see the food, it’s not very appealing to eat vegetables,” said Smith, who was completing the exercise as part of an aging simulation activity in the Developing the Physician II course at OSU College of Osteopathic Medicine.

The exercise included seven stations simulating different sensory and physical deficits associated with aging and common health problems of older adults. The simulation enables the students to experience how these changes affect their patients.

To read the full story, visit the OSU-CHS website.

Arkansas River bridge closed Saturday morning for Sweetheart Run

The 2015 Sweetheart Run will close the Arkansas River bridge on Southwest Boulevard near the OSU-CHS campus early Saturday morning.

Event coordinators will begin setting up for the run which goes through downtown, Riverside Drive and west across the Arkansas River. Streets, including Southwest Boulevard to a point just west of the river, will close around 6 a.m. and reopen at about 10:30 a.m.

Access to campus will be available via Interstate 244/Highway 75 or from Jackson Avenue and Southwest Boulevard from the south.

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