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OSU Center for Health Sciences News

Thursday, Feb. 26, 2015

Research Day provides a showcase for innovative, creative work

OSU-CHS graduate student Christian Heck describes his research project to Sandy Cooper, assistant vice president for OSU in Tulsa Human Resources.
OSU-CHS graduate student Christian Heck describes his research project to Sandy Cooper, assistant vice president for OSU in Tulsa Human Resources.

The 2015 OSU in Tulsa Research Day on Friday highlighted the variety and depth of student and faculty research happening at OSU-CHS and OSU-Tulsa.

This year’s Research Day, hosted in Founders Hall at OSU-CHS, included 67 research posters and seven oral presentations, the most entries since the event was launched in 2011, said Amanda Benn, assistant director of clinical research at OSU-CHS.

Research Day judges honored 32 research posters and oral presentations in several categories, including engineering, biomedical sciences, human sciences, anatomy and cell biology, biochemistry and microbiology, medical residents, medical students, undergraduate research and high school student research.

To see the full list of Research Day winners, visit the OSU in Tulsa Research Day website.

OSU-CHS graduate course teaches kids what it means to be a scientist

Graduate student Amie Francis explains experimental methods to two Eugene Field Elementary fourth-graders during an after-school science program.
Graduate student Amie Francis explains experimental methods to two Eugene Field Elementary fourth-graders during an after-school science program.

When a group of OSU-CHS graduate students asked fourth-graders at Eugene Field Elementary School in Tulsa to describe what a scientist looks like, they got a lot of stereotypical answers: “Scientists wear white coats and glasses and have big hair like Albert Einstein,” they were told.

The graduate students are the first to enroll in a new course that teaches them to develop and institute a scientific outreach program in area elementary schools that will increase understanding of science and its benefits to society.

“In the Scientific Outreach course, OSU-CHS graduate students work to demystify science by replacing kids’ preconceived notion of science with real world examples,” said Kathleen Curtis, Ph.D., OSU-CHS associate professor of physiology and course coordinator.

The graduate students learn useful strategies and gain insight into implementing scientific outreach programs in schools. They are also sparking enthusiasm among the fourth-graders about science.

To read the full story about the Scientific Outreach course, visit the OSU-CHS website.

Residency Fair offers opportunity to learn about post-graduate programs

Medical students will have the opportunity to explore post-graduate programs in Oklahoma and other states the OSU-COM 2015 Residency Fair at 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. on Friday, March 27 in Founders Hall.

Representatives from about 20 programs will be on hand to introduce students to residency opportunities in obstetrics/gynecology, emergency medicine, family medicine, pediatrics and more, including OSU Medical Center and several other hospitals in the state.

Cherokee Nation Health Professional Recruitment and Retention, Choctaw Nation Health Center and U.S. Army Healthcare Recruiting will be represented as well as the Bay Area Corpus Christi Medical Center, Freeman Health System in Joplin, Mo. and the University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences in Pine Bluff.

The fair is open to all medical students and provides information on how to apply for and what to expect during the post-graduate experience. For more information, contact Ashley Groom, academic assistant in the OSU-CHS Office of Clinical Education.

Cancer researcher to share insight at Lunch and Learn

Meyer
Meyer

William Meyer, M.D., CMRI Ben Johnson Chair in pediatric hematology-oncology at the University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, will discuss his ongoing childhood cancer research at the St. Baldrick’s Foundation Lunch and Learn on Thursday, March 5 at noon in D-107.

He receives funding from the St. Baldrick’s Childhood Cancer Research Foundation, a national organization dedicated to funding childhood cancer research. OSU-COM’s Student Osteopathic Medical Association has set a goal of raising $20,000 for the foundation.

Meyer will examine how the foundation’s contributions are leading to discoveries that could help eliminate childhood cancer. There will be a $5 donation for pizza.

TU professor to discuss nanobattery development at MSE Seminar

Teeters
Teeters

Dale Teeters, Ph.D., professor and chair of the Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry at the University of Tulsa, will examine how nanotechnology can be used to improve batteries and create new devices, at the Materials Science and Engineering Seminar today at 2 p.m. in Helmerich Research Center 153 at OSU-Tulsa.

The seminar, presented by the OSU School of Materials Science and Engineering, will explore how nanoscale chemistry can increase power and decrease the size of batteries through the creation of nanobatteries. Nanobatteries are so small that 240 of them will fit into the diameter of a human hair.

Teeters is a member of the executive committee for the National Science Foundation’s Oklahoma NanoNet Nanotechnology Center and serves on the Oklahoma Center for the Advancement of Science and Technology applied research committee. He also is a member of the Advisory Board for the Oklahoma State Nanotechnology Initiative.

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