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OSU Center for Health Sciences News

Thursday, June 4, 2015

STATE Magazine: Stepping up to the challenge

Judge Terence Kern, right, and his wife, Jeanette
Judge Terence Kern, right, and his wife, Jeanette

Senior U.S. District Judge Terence Kern, a ’66 graduate of OSU, and his wife recognize how incredible OSU Medicine has been in educating doctors who are from Oklahoma, stay in Oklahoma, and practice in small Oklahoma communities.

Judge Kern first recognized the difficulty in attracting good doctors to small communities while serving as chairman of the board of a hospital in Ardmore a number of years ago. Judge Kern and his wife, Jeanette, later realized the severity of the physician shortage in Oklahoma while Jeanette’s daughter, Julie, was a student in the OSU College of Osteopathic Medicine in Tulsa.

According to America’s Health Rankings, Oklahoma ranks 48th in the nation for primary care physicians per capita. Just as alarming is the fact that one in four Oklahoma physicians is over the age of 60.

Now Judge Kern and Jeanette are stepping up to support the work of the OSU Center for Health Sciences and President Shrum and combat the physician shortage. In June 2014, the Kerns, along with Jeanette’s brother, Tim Headington, donated $750,000 to establish the Kern-Headington Scholarship Challenge.

To read the full story, visit the OSU-CHS website.

Oklahoma Office of Rural Health receives award for rural health service

Lara Brooks, OSU Center for Rural Health analyst, Rod Hargrave, program coordinator with the Oklahoma Office of Rural Health, and Corie Kaiser, OORH director, accepted the Rural Program of the Year Award from Espa Bowen, president of the Rural Health Association of Oklahoma, at the Spring Rural Health Conference.
Lara Brooks, OSU Center for Rural Health analyst, Rod Hargrave, program coordinator with the Oklahoma Office of Rural Health, and Corie Kaiser, OORH director, accepted the Rural Program of the Year Award from Espa Bowen, president of the Rural Health Association of Oklahoma, at the Spring Rural Health Conference.

The Oklahoma Office of Rural Health was recognized last week by the Rural Health Association of Oklahoma for its work in rural health. The organization received the Rural Program of the Year Award at the 2015 Spring Rural Health Conference in Norman.

“The OORH has been a leader in rural health advocacy and quality for many years. It has served as the focal point for discussion and debate about quality, operations, policy and legislation on both the state and federal levels,” said Val Schott, Rural Health Association of Oklahoma board member. “Oklahomans, especially those who live in rural areas, are in a much better position because of this advocacy and support.”

OORH was established in 1991 as part of federal efforts to coordinate, plan and promote quality healthcare for underserved rural Oklahomans. The office works with rural communities to help ensure their healthcare infrastructure is economically viable and to broaden and improve the access and quality of healthcare services.

OORH manages the Medicare Rural Hospital Flexibility grant, the State Office of Rural Health Grant and the Small Hospital Improvement Program grant.

The cornerstone of the program is the Community Health Needs Assessment.  This is a series of meetings with local leaders and citizens who seek to educate the community on just how economically critical it is to use and maintain local hospital services and healthcare providers. The Flex program is instrumental in helping the 34 critical access hospitals in Oklahoma remain open and viable. 

The theme for this year’s Spring Rural Health Conference, a partnership between the Rural Health Association of Oklahoma and the Oklahoma Office of Rural Health at OSU-CHS, was “Spring Forward for Oklahoma Rural Health.”

Hall elected president of OSU-CHS Faculty Senate

Hall
Hall

Sarah Hall, D.O., clinical assistant professor of family medicine, has been elected president of the OSU-CHS Faculty Senate for 2015-16.

Hall succeeds former president Randall Davis, Ph.D., director of the Biomedical Sciences Graduate Program and associate professor of pharmacology.

Hall graduated from OSU-COM in 2005. That year, she received the Regents’ Distinguished Student Award, the LaButti Outstanding Scholar Award, the Clinical Excellence Award and Outstanding Student in Microbiology Award. She is a member of the American College of Osteopathic Family Physicians, the American Osteopathic Association and the Oklahoma Osteopathic Association.

Transforming medical education in Oklahoma

Advertisement by OSU in Tulsa Marketing and Communications Services
Advertisement by OSU Marketing and Communications Services in Tulsa

The A.R. and Marylouise Tandy Foundation has donated $8 million to help fund the construction of a new academic building at Oklahoma State University Center for Health Sciences. In honor of the historic gift, the largest ever given to OSU Center for Health Sciences, the facility will be named the A.R. and Marylouise Tandy Medical Academic Building. The Tandy Foundation’s generous investment in our students will provide state-of-the-art training for the next generation of Oklahoma physicians and transform medical education in Tulsa.

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