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OSU Center for Health Sciences News

THURSDAY, Dec. 10, 2015

Cancer Sucks donates $15K to support OSU-CHS cancer research

Alea Hubbard, senior development coordinator for the OSU Foundation, left, and Janaki Iyer, Ph.D., post-doctorate fellow in biochemistry and microbiology, accept a cancer research grant from Cancer Sucks, Inc. founder Rick Horton at a recent concert.
Alea Hubbard, senior development coordinator for the OSU Foundation, left, and Janaki Iyer, Ph.D., post-doctorate fellow in biochemistry and microbiology, accepts a cancer research grant from Cancer Sucks, Inc. founder Rick Horton at a recent concert.

Cancer Sucks, Inc. recently awarded a $15,000 grant to help fund cancer research being conducted by Rashmi Kaul, Ph.D., at OSU-CHS in Tulsa. Since 2006, Kaul has received more than $165,000 in grants from the local nonprofit group to fund her research on liver and uterine cancer.

Kaul’s research examines how chronic infections like the hepatitis C virus lead to the development of liver cancer and how some chronic infections in the uterus may cause uterine cancer. In addition, she is researching the link between hormones and cancer and seeking early detection markers that could improve treatment and survival rates. She is also working with material scientists at the Helmerich Research Center on using nanodiamonds as therapeutics for targeting resistance bacteria or cancer cells.

Janaki Iyer, Ph.D., OSU-CHS doctoral fellow in biochemistry and microbiology, and Alea Hubbard, senior development coordinator for the OSU Foundation, accepted the grant for Kaul at the 11th annual Cancer Sucks Concert at Cain’s Ballroom on Nov. 28. Read more.

OSU-COM ranked among top medical schools for primary care

Charles Bingham, OMSIII, speaks with  second-year students Kaleb Vaughn, Rachel Wirginis and Benjamin Cesarz during  the mini speed conferences for Rural Health Focus Week.
Second-year medical students Ebenezer Sampong, left, Jeree Smith and Tiffany Scheuplein practice inserting a breathing tube on a simulation mannequin during Didactic Week in October.

The OSU College of Osteopathic Medicine has been named one of the best medical schools for primary care in the country by USCollegeRanking.org.

OSU-COM placed 77th among all medical schools in the nation. The schools are evaluated based on 10 indicators, including teaching quality, academic research, student selectivity, staff/student ratio and more.

The group uses data and information from the National Center for Education Statistics, U.S. National Research Council and publications such as U.S. News & World Report to determine its rankings.

BOLT participants graduate from professional development program

Clockwise from top right are Randall Popp, Don Lowther, Mary Bea Drummond, Duane Kohler, Robert Sammons, Dohn Martin, Jeff Hackler, Sarah Peterson, Susan Steele, Lora Cotton, Sarah Hall, Brandy Close and Jarrad Wagner.
Clockwise from top right are Randall Popp, Don Lowther, Mary Bea Drummond, Duane Koehler, Robert Sammons, Dohn Martin, Jeff Hackler, Sarah Peterson, Susan Steele, Lora Cotton, Sarah Hall, Brandy Close and Jarrad Wagner.

Thirteen OSU-CHS and OSU-Tulsa faculty and staff were honored on Tuesday for completing Bright Orange Leaders in Tulsa (BOLT) during a luncheon at the OSU-Tulsa Helmerich Research Center. BOLT is a professional development program offered by OSU in Tulsa Human Resources to develop leadership and communication skills among university leaders.

William Pettit, D.O., OSU-CHS provost, Ron Bussert, J.D., OSU-Tulsa vice president of administration and finance, and Sandy Cooper, J.D., assistant vice president for human resources, provided introductory remarks. Rhett Laubach, owner and operator of Your Next Speaker, LLC and PLO, Inc. and program leader, also spoke at the event.

The 2015 BOLT graduates are Brandy Close, OSU-CHS director of curricular affairs, instructional design and academic technologies; Lora Cotton, D.O., vice chair of family medicine and statewide program director for the family medicine residency; Mary Bea Drummond, Ed.D., assistant vice president for OSU marketing and communications services in Tulsa; Jeff Hackler, J.D., assistant to the dean for rural service programs and chair of the Department of Rural Health; Sarah Hall, D.O., assistant professor of family medicine; Duane Koehler, D.O., assistant to the dean for rural education; Don Lowther, OSU-CHS director of fiscal affairs; Dohn Martin, OSU-CHS medical library director; Sarah Peterson, OSU-Tulsa library director; Randall Popp, director of information technology; Robert Sammons, OSU-CHS director of clinical education; Susan Steele, D.O., chair of the department of medical education; and Jarrad Wagner, Ph.D., associate professor of forensic sciences.

As part of the program, the BOLT graduates presented a video about what they learned in the program and how it has shaped their leadership skills. To learn more about BOLT, visit the OSU in Tulsa professional development website.

OSU-CHS to deliver holiday gifts to Eugene Field Elementary

About 40 students at Eugene Field Elementary will have a brighter holiday because of the generosity of OSU-CHS students, faculty and staff. Gifts donated through the annual Angel Tree program will be delivered to the school on Monday to be sorted by teachers and staff.

Each gift consists of a book, an item of clothing and a requested toy. Donations include scooters, remote control cars, Legos, art supplies, books, clothes and more.

Children in two fifth-grade classes will open the presents on Friday, Dec. 18. Those interested in attending the class parties should email Lindsey Yoder or Bria Taylor for additional information. Eugene Field Elementary is the OSU-CHS Partner in Education school.

IN THE NEWS

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