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OSU Center for Health Sciences News

thursday, march 31, 2016

OSU-CHS medical students introduced as Schweitzer Fellows at reception

Susan Steele, D.O., left, Randy Wymore, Ph.D., Michael Sutton, first-year medical student and Tulsa Schweitzer Fellow, Robin Dyer, D.O., Richard Wansley, Ph.D., Tim Nissen, first-year medical student and Tulsa Schweitzer Fellow, Shannon McBeath, first-year medical student and Tulsa Schweitzer Fellow and Zach Giano, Tulsa Schweitzer Fellow and doctoral student in human development and family science at OSU-Tulsa, attended the Tulsa Schweitzer Fellow reception on Tuesday evening at the University of Tulsa Allen Chapman Student Union.
Susan Steele, D.O., left, Randy Wymore, Ph.D., Michael Sutton, first-year medical student and Tulsa Schweitzer Fellow, Robin Dyer, D.O., Richard Wansley, Ph.D., Tim Nissen, first-year medical student and Tulsa Schweitzer Fellow, Shannon McBeath, first-year medical student and Tulsa Schweitzer Fellow and Zach Giano, Tulsa Schweitzer Fellow and doctoral student in human development and family science at OSU-Tulsa, attended the Tulsa Schweitzer Fellow reception on Tuesday evening at the University of Tulsa Allen Chapman Student Union.

First-year medical students Shannon McBeath, Tim Nissen and Michael Sutton were introduced as members of the inaugural class of Tulsa Albert Schweitzer Fellows during a special reception on Tuesday evening at the University of Tulsa Allen Chapman Student Union.

They will spend the next year learning to effectively address social factors that impact health and developing lifelong leadership skills.

Also in attendance at the reception were Susan Steele, D.O., clinical associate professor of family medicine, Randy Wymore, Ph.D., associate professor of pharmacology and physiology, Robin Dyer, D.O., associate dean for academic affairs and Richard Wansley, Ph.D., associate professor of behavioral sciences. Read more.

Volberding recognized for contributions to athletic training education

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Volberding

Jennifer Volberding, Ph.D., athletic training program director and assistant professor at OSU-CHS, recently was honored with the Mid America Athletic Trainers’ Association Ethnically Diverse and Female Recognition Award at the organization’s annual meeting and symposium in Springfield, Mo.

The award is presented to an individual who has contributed significantly to the professional development of ethnically diverse or female athletic trainers or has made significant advancement in health care services to an ethnically diverse or female population.

Volberding currently is researching ways to educate athletic trainers about effective communication and appropriate treatment among culturally diverse populations. She earned her bachelor’s degree at Boston University, a master’s degree at Georgia State University and a doctorate at the University of Kansas.

CHSI brings MIT MakerHEALTH to Tulsa

OSU's Center for Health Systems Innovation will bring prominent MakerHEALTH innovator Anna Young from Massachusetts Institute of Technology to Tulsa for a free workshop from 9-11:30 a.m. on Saturday at the OSU-CHS Dunlap Auditorium.

The MakerHEALTH event is designed to teach people how the tools and materials of the maker movement are being brought to health care. Attendees will learn about design, experiment with MakerHEALTH prototypes and get inspired to create.

“MakerHEALTH is bringing the tools and materials of the maker movement to hospitals, health care providers and medical schools, giving them the power to improve care,” said Kayse Shrum, D.O., president of OSU-CHS. “The maker movement inspires us to think outside the box when it comes to health care delivery and CHSI is pleased to have the resources of some of the brightest minds in the country with us.” Read more.

Cowboy Alert to provide NWS messages for tornado warnings

Cowboy Alert subscribers will soon receive notification via text message when the National Weather Service declares a tornado warning in an area within 10 miles of the OSU-CHS main campus.

Students, faculty and staff are encouraged to sign up for Cowboy Alert to receive tornado warnings and other emergency text and voicemail alerts on campus. The system helps alert subscribers about campus emergencies, such as weather-related closings, active shooters or immediate biohazard threats.

To opt in to the Cowboy Alert system, log in to the
O-KEY system, click on Campus Alerts and Notifications in the left column and add your contact information.

Seminar to examine translational microbiome research

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Petrosino

Joseph F. Petrosino, Ph.D., director of the Alkek Center for Metagenomics and Microbiome Research at the Baylor College of Medicine in Houston, will speak at noon tomorrow in D-207 about human microbiome research during the First Friday Seminar at OSU-CHS.

An associate professor of molecular virology and microbiology, Petrosino will discuss a translational microbiome research model for clinical and environmental research. Translational microbiome research examines the impact of the human microbiome on health and disease. He will also examine microbiome research relating to time-of-death investigations in forensic sciences.

The seminar is free and open to the public. It is hosted by the OSU-CHS School of Forensic Sciences.

Combining medicine and research

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OSU-COM instills a desire in our students to become the best physicians. By combining research with osteopathic medicine training, OSU-CHS creates an environment where future physicians like Brittany Bolt can flourish while learning advanced skills and developing new treatments to improve patient care. The education students receive at OSU is preparing the next generation of Oklahoma physicians and shaping the future of health care in our state.

Watch a video featuring second-year medical student Brittany Bolt as she discusses her views on using research to improve the practice of medicine.

IN THE NEWS