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OSU Center for Health Sciences News

thursday, may 19, 2016

Biomedical sciences doctoral candidates receive travel awards, fellowships

Core, left, and Figueroa-Hall
Core, left, and Figueroa-Hall

Four biomedical sciences doctoral students have been selected for summer travel awards or fellowships, said Randall Davis, Ph.D., director of the Biomedical Sciences Graduate Program and associate professor of pharmacology.

Leandra Figueroa-Hall received a travel award to attend the Postdoctoral Preparation Institute 2016 in Bethesda, Md. in June. Leigha Lynch was awarded the Robberson Summer Research Fellowship from the OSU Graduate College.

Sheri Core and Dusti Sloan won travel awards to present research posters in July at the joint meeting of the American Physiological Society and The Physiological Society in Dublin, Ireland. Read more.

STATE Magazine: Discoveries in the dirt

Anne Weil, right, helps a student in the Sam Noble Museum’s ExplorOlogy program at the Homestead site.
Anne Weil, right, helps a student in the Sam Noble Museum’s ExplorOlogy program at the Homestead site.

When Ian Browne was hooded by Kent Smith, Ph.D., at the 2015 OSU-CHS commencement ceremony, he became the first graduate of a new biomedical sciences track in anatomy and vertebrate paleontology at the Tulsa-based academic health center.

“It’s a rigorous program that really gives you a good background and solid foundation in anatomy and vertebrate paleontology,” says Browne, who is now working as a postdoctoral fellow at OSU-CHS in the Department of Anatomy and Cell Biology. “The small size of the campus enables you to really develop good relationships with the faculty and to learn a lot from them.”

OSU’s medical school has joined a growing national trend of hiring paleontologists to teach anatomy courses to medical students. The symbiotic relationship enables these faculty members to pursue research opportunities in the competitive field of paleontology while training the next generation of Oklahoma physicians. Read more.

Operation Orange to take medical camps across the state

Second-year medical student Jamin Brown helps a high school student insert a breathing tube in a patient simulation mannequin during Operation Orange in Stillwater last summer.
Second-year medical student Jamin Brown helps a high school student insert a breathing tube in a patient simulation mannequin during Operation Orange in Stillwater last summer.

OSU-CHS will take medical school summer camps for high school students to four cities across the state beginning Tuesday, June 7.

Operation Orange will begin at OSU in Stillwater on June 7 and June 14 and travel to Cameron University in Lawton on June 9, Southwestern Oklahoma State University in Weatherford on June 10 and Sequoyah High School in Tahlequah on June 17.

OSU-CHS medical students will guide participants through hands-on activities to provide a taste of the medical school experience. Participants will get a chance to study the anatomy of a human brain, heart and lungs, learn to insert breathing tubes in a simulated patient, listen to a simulation of a patient’s heart and lungs and learn more about career opportunities in the health care field. For more information about the program, visit the Operation Orange website.

Energy Conservation Program reaches about $4 million in savings

Going Green logo

OSU-CHS has saved at least $1.8 million in energy costs as part of the university’s green initiative, an increase from about $1.7 million last year. Together, OSU-CHS and OSU-Tulsa energy conservation efforts have resulted in a cost savings of about $4 million since 2007.

The program was designed to limit utility energy consumption primarily when buildings and spaces are unoccupied. It utilizes standardized best practices and guidelines to promote responsible energy management and encourages students, faculty and staff to be energy savers as well as energy consumers, said Angelyn Holmes, assistant director of facilities management.

Some of the tips provided to help the university save energy costs are shutting off lights, powering off computers and monitors when not in use, keeping windows closed and lowering blinds on south and west sides of buildings. To learn about additional steps to conserve energy, view Go Pokes! Go Green! Tip Sheet.

IN THE NEWS