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OSU Center for Health Sciences News

thursday, September 15, 2016

Old fire station introduced as new crime scene investigation lab

OSU-CHS forensic sciences student Tierney Mullaney conducts a tour of the newly renovated crime scene investigation lab on Wednesday.
OSU-CHS forensic sciences student Tierney Mullaney conducts a tour of the newly renovated crime scene investigation lab on Wednesday.

OSU-CHS has transformed a former Tulsa fire station into a crime scene investigation laboratory for students in the forensic sciences graduate program.

On Wednesday, the OSU School of Forensic Sciences opened the Investigative Sciences Research and Teaching Laboratory to tours. OSU-CHS purchased the old Tulsa fire station in 2014 during an auction of surplus properties by the City of Tulsa.

The 2,670-square-foot building will be used as a crime scene investigation laboratory for master’s students in the forensic science program. Instructors will be able to stage mock crime scenes for students to investigate, potentially adding video and audio recording equipment so exercises can critiqued by experts. In addition, the facility will be used during training sessions for area law enforcement.

Royal Society of London to feature Gignac’s scientific works of art

Micro-CT scan of snake head and brain by Paul Gignac, Ph.D.
Micro-CT scan of snake head and brain by Paul Gignac, Ph.D. and collaborator Nathan Kley, Ph.D., at Stony Brook University in New York

The Royal Society of London has selected Paul Gignac, Ph.D., assistant professor of anatomy, as a finalist of its annual photography competition and will display Gignac’s work during an international exhibition on Saturday and Sunday in London.

Gignac’s submission is a chemically enhanced micro-CT scan of a snake head and brain. The image was produced in collaboration with Nathan Kley, Ph.D., at Stony Brook University in New York and is part of his research into methods capable of visualizing soft-tissue anatomy in micro-CT images. The research is funded through a $300,000 National Science Foundation grant and is part of a worldwide research initiative through diceCT.

The photography competition celebrates the power of photography to communicate science and the role images play in making science more accessible to a wide audience. To view featured photos at the Open House exhibition, visit The Royal Society of London.

San Bernardino officer details terrorist attack in seminar

Fyvie
Fyvie

Sgt. Eric Fyvie, of the San Bernardino Police Department in California, described the lessons he and fellow officers learned from the mass shooting last December at a training event yesterday. OSU-CHS hosted the presentation for area law enforcement.

“OSU-CHS has always been interested in supporting law enforcement and public safety,” said Jarrad Wagner, director of the Forensic Toxicology and Trace Chemistry Laboratory and professor of forensic sciences. “Since no agency is equipped to deal with all of the issues in an event of this size alone, the incident commander in San Bernardino shared what he learned and how he integrated his police department with multiple other agencies to deal with the terrorist attack.”

In his presentation, “Incident Management in Law Enforcement Response to Terrorism – the San Bernardino Experience,” Fyvie discussed the department’s response to the attack that left 14 people dead and 22 seriously injured. Fyvie was incident commander at the scene and is coordinator of San Bernardino’s Community Emergency Response Team.

He also examined the cooperation among city, state and federal law enforcement agencies and provided an investigation summary and after-action report for attendees.

Earthquake Safety Tips

Oklahoma experienced its strongest earthquake ever earlier this month when a 5.8-magnitude temblor hit Pawnee, which is about 55 miles northwest of Tulsa. As earthquakes become more common in Oklahoma, OSU-CHS wants to let students, faculty and staff know a few basic safety tips if you feel movement:

  • Drop to the ground, take cover under a sturdy table or piece of furniture and hold on until the shaking stops.
  • Move away from glass, windows, outside doors and walls and objects that can fall.
  • Stay inside until the shaking stops and it is safe to go outside.
  • Do not use elevators or stairs.
  • If you are outside, stay outside and move away from buildings, streetlights and utility wires.
  • Avoid stopping near or under buildings, bridges, ramps or overpasses.

To learn more tips about preparing for and surviving an earthquake, visit the OSU Campus Safety website.

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